Model Makers, Wood

Construct full-size and scale wooden precision models of products. Includes wood jig builders and loft workers.

Median Annual Wage: $30,940

Education: High school diploma or equivalent (48%); Post-secondary certificate (32%); Less than high school diploma (16%)

Projected Growth: Slower than average (3% to 7%)

Related Job Titles: Model Maker; Sample Maker; Sample Worker; Craftsman; Model Builder; Sample Builder; Product Development Carpenter

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Source: O*NET OnLine information for Model Makers, Wood.

More Production Careers

  • Read blueprints, drawings, or written specifications, and consult with designers to determine sizes and shapes of patterns and required machine setups.
  • Set up, operate, and adjust a variety of woodworking machines such as bandsaws and planers to cut and shape sections, parts, and patterns, according to specifications.
  • Fit, fasten, and assemble wood parts together to form patterns, models, or sections, using glue, nails, dowels, bolts, screws, and other fasteners.
  • Trim, smooth, and shape surfaces, and plane, shave, file, scrape, and sand models to attain specified shapes, using hand tools.
  • Select wooden stock, determine layouts, and mark layouts of parts on stock, using precision equipment such as scribers, squares, and protractors.
  • Construct wooden models, patterns, templates, full scale mock-ups, and molds for parts of products and production tools.
  • Mark identifying information on patterns, parts, and templates to indicate assembly methods and details.
  • Plan, lay out, and draw outlines of units, sectional patterns, or full-scale mock-ups of products.
  • Fabricate work aids such as scrapers or templates.
  • Maintain pattern records for reference.
  • Build jigs that can be used as guides for assembling oversized or special types of box shooks.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Model Makers, Wood.

  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Operations Analysis - Analyzing needs and product requirements to create a design.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Time Management - Managing one's own time and the time of others.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Model Makers, Wood.

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