Surveying Technicians

Adjust and operate surveying instruments, such as the theodolite and electronic distance-measuring equipment, and compile notes, make sketches and enter data into computers.

Median Annual Wage: $40,770

Education: High school diploma or equivalent (39%); Associate's degree (21%); Post-secondary certificate (21%)

Projected Growth: Average (8% to 14%)

Related Job Titles: Engineering Technician; Engineering Assistant; Survey Party Chief; Survey Technician; Survey Crew Chief; Instrument Man (I-Man); Chainman; Rodman; Instrument Operator; Field Crew Chief

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Source: O*NET OnLine information for Surveying Technicians.

More Architecture and Engineering Careers

  • Perform calculations to determine earth curvature corrections, atmospheric impacts on measurements, traverse closures and adjustments, azimuths, level runs, and placement of markers.
  • Record survey measurements and descriptive data using notes, drawings, sketches, and inked tracings.
  • Search for section corners, property irons, and survey points.
  • Position and hold the vertical rods, or targets, that theodolite operators use for sighting to measure angles, distances, and elevations.
  • Lay out grids, and determine horizontal and vertical controls.
  • Compare survey computations with applicable standards to determine adequacy of data.
  • Set out and recover stakes, marks, and other monumentation.
  • Conduct surveys to ascertain the locations of natural features and man-made structures on the Earth's surface, underground, and underwater using electronic distance-measuring equipment and other surveying instruments.
  • Direct and supervise work of subordinate members of surveying parties.
  • Compile information necessary to stake projects for construction, using engineering plans.
  • Prepare topographic and contour maps of land surveyed, including site features and other relevant information such as charts, drawings, and survey notes.
  • Place and hold measuring tapes when electronic distance-measuring equipment is not used.
  • Collect information needed to carry out new surveys using source maps, previous survey data, photographs, computer records, and other relevant information.
  • Operate and manage land-information computer systems, performing tasks such as storing data, making inquiries, and producing plots and reports.
  • Run rods for benches and cross-section elevations.
  • Perform manual labor, such as cutting brush for lines, carrying stakes, rebar, and other heavy items, and stacking rods.
  • Maintain equipment and vehicles used by surveying crews.
  • Provide assistance in the development of methods and procedures for conducting field surveys.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Surveying Technicians.

  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Mathematics - Using mathematics to solve problems.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Time Management - Managing one's own time and the time of others.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Coordination - Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Surveying Technicians.

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