Sociologists

Study human society and social behavior by examining the groups and social institutions that people form, as well as various social, religious, political, and business organizations. May study the behavior and interaction of groups, trace their origin and growth, and analyze the influence of group activities on individual members.

Median Annual Wage: $72,810

Education: Doctoral degree (52%); Master's degree (28%); Bachelor's degree (10%)

Projected Growth: Faster than average (15% to 21%)

Related Job Titles: Research Scientist; Research Associate; Behavioral Scientist; Research Coordinator; Social Scientist; Foundation Program Director; International Health Director (Health Science Administration); Policy Analyst; Research and Evaluation Manager; Research Center Director

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Source: O*NET OnLine information for Sociologists.

More Life, Physical, and Social Science Careers

  • Analyze and interpret data to increase the understanding of human social behavior.
  • Plan and conduct research to develop and test theories about societal issues such as crime, group relations, poverty, and aging.
  • Collect data about the attitudes, values, and behaviors of people in groups, using observation, interviews, and review of documents.
  • Develop, implement, and evaluate methods of data collection, such as questionnaires or interviews.
  • Direct work of statistical clerks, statisticians, and others who compile and evaluate research data.
  • Teach sociology.
  • Consult with and advise individuals such as administrators, social workers, and legislators regarding social issues and policies, as well as the implications of research findings.
  • Collaborate with research workers in other disciplines.
  • Develop approaches to the solution of groups' problems, based on research findings in sociology and related disciplines.
  • Observe group interactions and role affiliations to collect data, identify problems, evaluate progress, and determine the need for additional change.
  • Develop problem intervention procedures, using techniques such as interviews, consultations, role playing, and participant observation of group interactions.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Sociologists.

  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Science - Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
  • Social Perceptiveness - Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
  • Instructing - Teaching others how to do something.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Learning Strategies - Selecting and using training/instructional methods and procedures appropriate for the situation when learning or teaching new things.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Sociologists.

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