Biological Technicians

Assist biological and medical scientists in laboratories. Set up, operate, and maintain laboratory instruments and equipment, monitor experiments, make observations, and calculate and record results. May analyze organic substances, such as blood, food, and drugs.

Median Annual Wage: $41,290

Education: Bachelor's degree (76%); High school diploma or equivalent (8%); Master's degree (5%)

Projected Growth: Average (8% to 14%)

Related Job Titles: Laboratory Technician; Environmental Technician; Research Associate; Research Assistant; Research Technician; Biological Technician; Biological Science Laboratory Technician; Research Specialist; Resource Biologist; Wildlife Biology Technician

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Source: O*NET OnLine information for Biological Technicians.

More Life, Physical, and Social Science Careers

  • Analyze experimental data and interpret results to write reports and summaries of findings.
  • Keep detailed logs of all work-related activities.
  • Use computers, computer-interfaced equipment, robotics or high-technology industrial applications to perform work duties.
  • Clean, maintain and prepare supplies and work areas.
  • Set up, adjust, calibrate, clean, maintain, and troubleshoot laboratory and field equipment.
  • Measure or weigh compounds and solutions for use in testing or animal feed.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Biological Technicians.

  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Science - Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Systems Analysis - Determining how a system should work and how changes in conditions, operations, and the environment will affect outcomes.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Biological Technicians.

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