Electric Motor, Power Tool, and Related Repairers

Repair, maintain, or install electric motors, wiring, or switches.

Median Annual Wage: $39,220

Education: High school diploma or equivalent (44%); Post-secondary certificate (40%); Less than high school diploma (10%)

Projected Growth: Decline (-3% or lower)

Related Job Titles: Maintenance Technician; Service Technician; Mechanic; Repair Technician; Electric Motor Winder; Tool Repair Technician; Power Tool Repair Technician; Electric Motor Repairman; Electro Mechanic; Motor Mechanic

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Source: O*NET OnLine information for Electric Motor, Power Tool, and Related Repairers.

More Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Careers

  • Record repairs required, parts used, and labor time.
  • Reassemble repaired electric motors to specified requirements and ratings, using hand tools and electrical meters.
  • Maintain stocks of parts.
  • Rewire electrical systems, and repair or replace electrical accessories.
  • Repair and rebuild defective mechanical parts in electric motors, generators, and related equipment, using hand tools and power tools.
  • Inspect electrical connections, wiring, relays, charging resistance boxes, and storage batteries, following wiring diagrams.
  • Read service guides to find information needed to perform repairs.
  • Inspect and test equipment to locate damage or worn parts and diagnose malfunctions, or read work orders or schematic drawings to determine required repairs.
  • Assemble electrical parts such as alternators, generators, starting devices, and switches, following schematic drawings and using hand, machine, and power tools.
  • Solder, wrap, and coat wires to ensure proper insulation.
  • Lubricate moving parts.
  • Remove and replace defective parts such as coil leads, carbon brushes, and wires, using soldering equipment.
  • Disassemble defective equipment so that repairs can be made, using hand tools.
  • Weld, braze, or solder electrical connections.
  • Lift units or parts such as motors or generators, using cranes or chain hoists, or signal crane operators to lift heavy parts or subassemblies.
  • Reface, ream, and polish commutators and machine parts to specified tolerances, using machine tools.
  • Adjust working parts, such as fan belts, contacts, and springs, using hand tools and gauges.
  • Clean cells, cell assemblies, glassware, leads, electrical connections, and battery poles, using scrapers, steam, water, emery cloths, power grinders, or acid.
  • Scrape and clean units or parts, using cleaning solvents and equipment such as buffing wheels.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Electric Motor, Power Tool, and Related Repairers.

  • Troubleshooting - Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
  • Quality Control Analysis - Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.
  • Equipment Selection - Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.
  • Equipment Maintenance - Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Electric Motor, Power Tool, and Related Repairers.

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