Mapping Technicians

Calculate mapmaking information from field notes, and draw and verify accuracy of topographical maps.

Median Annual Wage: $40,770

Education: Bachelor's degree (48%); Some college, no degree (14%); Post-secondary certificate (13%)

Projected Growth: Average (8% to 14%)

Related Job Titles: Photogrammetric Technician; Mapping Technician; Stereoplotter Operator; Photogrammetric Compilation Specialist; Photogrammetric Stereo Compiler; Aerotriangulation Specialist; CAD Technician (Computer Aided Design Technician); Geospatial Analyst; Mapping Editor; Tax Map Technician

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Source: O*NET OnLine information for Mapping Technicians.

More Architecture and Engineering Careers

  • Design or develop information databases that include geographic or topographic data.
  • Monitor mapping work or the updating of maps to ensure accuracy, the inclusion of new or changed information, or compliance with rules and regulations.
  • Produce or update overlay maps to show information boundaries, water locations, or topographic features on various base maps or at different scales.
  • Determine scales, line sizes, or colors to be used for hard copies of computerized maps, using plotters.
  • Identify and compile database information to create maps in response to requests.
  • Analyze aerial photographs to detect and interpret significant military, industrial, resource, or topographical data.
  • Enter Global Positioning System (GPS) data, legal deeds, field notes, or land survey reports into geographic information system (GIS) workstations so that information can be transformed into graphic land descriptions, such as maps or drawings.
  • Research and combine existing property information to describe property boundaries in relation to adjacent properties, taking into account parcel splits, combinations, or land boundary adjustments.
  • Calculate latitudes, longitudes, angles, areas, or other information for mapmaking, using survey field notes or reference tables.
  • Compare topographical features or contour lines with images from aerial photographs, old maps, or other reference materials to verify the accuracy of their identification.
  • Trace contours or topographic details to generate maps that denote specific land or property locations or geographic attributes.
  • Research resources such as survey maps or legal descriptions to verify property lines or to obtain information needed for mapping.
  • Trim, align, and join prints to form photographic mosaics, maintaining scaled distances between reference points.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Mapping Technicians.

  • Mathematics - Using mathematics to solve problems.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Time Management - Managing one's own time and the time of others.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Mapping Technicians.

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