Agricultural Engineers

Apply knowledge of engineering technology and biological science to agricultural problems concerned with power and machinery, electrification, structures, soil and water conservation, and processing of agricultural products.

Median Annual Wage: $71,730

Education: Bachelor's degree (87%); Master's degree (4%); Post-baccalaureate certificate (4%)

Projected Growth: Slower than average (3% to 7%)

Related Job Titles: Agricultural Engineer; Agricultural Safety and Health Program Director; Research Agricultural Engineer; Research Leader; Agricultural Systems Specialist; Conservation Engineer; Project Engineer; Engineer; Professor; Assistant Professor

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Source: O*NET OnLine information for Agricultural Engineers.

More Architecture and Engineering Careers

  • Provide advice on water quality and issues related to pollution management, river control, and ground and surface water resources.
  • Design and supervise environmental and land reclamation projects in agriculture and related industries.
  • Design agricultural machinery components and equipment, using computer-aided design (CAD) technology.
  • Discuss plans with clients, contractors, consultants, and other engineers so that they can be evaluated and necessary changes made.
  • Design food processing plants and related mechanical systems.
  • Plan and direct construction of rural electric-power distribution systems, and irrigation, drainage, and flood control systems for soil and water conservation.
  • Test agricultural machinery and equipment to ensure adequate performance.
  • Design structures for crop storage, animal shelter and loading, and animal and crop processing, and supervise their construction.
  • Supervise food processing or manufacturing plant operations.
  • Visit sites to observe environmental problems, to consult with contractors, or to monitor construction activities.
  • Conduct educational programs that provide farmers or farm cooperative members with information that can help them improve agricultural productivity.
  • Meet with clients, such as district or regional councils, farmers, and developers, to discuss their needs.
  • Design sensing, measuring, and recording devices, and other instrumentation used to study plant or animal life.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Agricultural Engineers.

  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Systems Analysis - Determining how a system should work and how changes in conditions, operations, and the environment will affect outcomes.
  • Systems Evaluation - Identifying measures or indicators of system performance and the actions needed to improve or correct performance, relative to the goals of the system.
  • Mathematics - Using mathematics to solve problems.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Agricultural Engineers.

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