Exercise Physiologists

Assess, plan, or implement fitness programs that include exercise or physical activities such as those designed to improve cardiorespiratory function, body composition, muscular strength, muscular endurance, or flexibility.

Median Annual Wage: $46,270

Education: Master's degree (57%); Bachelor's degree (32%); Post-baccalaureate certificate (11%)

Projected Growth: Average (8% to 14%)

Related Job Titles: Bariatric Weight Loss Clinic Manager and Counselor; Cardiac Rehabilitation Program Director; Clinical Coordinator, Heart Failure Cardiac Rehabilitation; Clinical Exercise Physiologist; Clinical Exercise Specialist; Coordinator Cardiopulmonary Services; Director of Cardiac Rehabilitation; Director of Rehabilitation and Wellness; Exercise Physiologist; Exercise Physiologist, Lifestyle and Weight Management Consultant

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Source: O*NET OnLine information for Exercise Physiologists.

More Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Careers

  • Prescribe individualized exercise programs, specifying equipment such as treadmill, exercise bicycle, ergometers, or perceptual goggles.
  • Interpret exercise program participant data to evaluate progress or identify needed program changes.
  • Explain exercise program or physiological testing procedures to participants.
  • Provide emergency or other appropriate medical care to participants with symptoms or signs of physical distress.
  • Provide clinical oversight of exercise for participants at all risk levels.
  • Demonstrate correct use of exercise equipment or performance of exercise routines.
  • Interview participants to obtain medical history or assess participant goals.
  • Recommend methods to increase lifestyle physical activity.
  • Assess physical performance requirements to aid in the development of individualized recovery or rehabilitation exercise programs.
  • Conduct stress tests, using electrocardiograph (EKG) machines.
  • Teach group exercise for low, medium, or high risk clients to improve participant strength, flexibility, endurance, or circulatory functioning.
  • Plan or conduct exercise physiology research projects.
  • Teach courses or seminars related to exercise or diet for patients, athletes, or community groups.
  • Measure amount of body fat, using such equipment as hydrostatic scale, skinfold calipers, or tape measures.
  • Teach behavior modification classes related to topics such as stress management or weight control.
  • Calibrate exercise or testing equipment.
  • Supervise maintenance of exercise or exercise testing equipment.
  • Measure oxygen consumption or lung functioning, using spirometers.
  • Educate athletes or coaches on techniques to improve athletic performance, such as heart rate monitoring, recovery techniques, hydration strategies, or training limits.
  • Present exercise knowledge, program information, or research study findings at professional meetings or conferences.
  • Order or recommend diagnostic procedures, such as stress tests, drug screenings, or urinary tests.
  • Mentor or train staff to lead group exercise.
  • Perform routine laboratory tests of blood samples for cholesterol level or glucose tolerance.
  • Evaluate staff performance in leading group exercise or conducting diagnostic tests.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Exercise Physiologists.

  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Service Orientation - Actively looking for ways to help people.
  • Instructing - Teaching others how to do something.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Social Perceptiveness - Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Exercise Physiologists.

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