Surveyors

Make exact measurements and determine property boundaries. Provide data relevant to the shape, contour, gravitation, location, elevation, or dimension of land or land features on or near the earth's surface for engineering, mapmaking, mining, land evaluation, construction, and other purposes.

Median Annual Wage: $57,050

Education: Bachelor's degree (55%); Post-secondary certificate (15%); Associate's degree (9%)

Projected Growth: Average (8% to 14%)

Related Job Titles: Engineering Technician; Engineer; Survey Party Chief; County Surveyor; Surveyor; Land Surveyor; Geodesist; Licensed Land Surveyor; Mine Surveyor; Professional Land Surveyor

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Source: O*NET OnLine information for Surveyors.

More Architecture and Engineering Careers

  • Search legal records, survey records, and land titles to obtain information about property boundaries in areas to be surveyed.
  • Calculate heights, depths, relative positions, property lines, and other characteristics of terrain.
  • Prepare and maintain sketches, maps, reports, and legal descriptions of surveys to describe, certify, and assume liability for work performed.
  • Direct or conduct surveys to establish legal boundaries for properties, based on legal deeds and titles.
  • Prepare or supervise preparation of all data, charts, plots, maps, records, and documents related to surveys.
  • Write descriptions of property boundary surveys for use in deeds, leases, or other legal documents.
  • Compute geodetic measurements and interpret survey data to determine positions, shapes, and elevations of geomorphic and topographic features.
  • Determine longitudes and latitudes of important features and boundaries in survey areas using theodolites, transits, levels, and satellite-based global positioning systems (GPS).
  • Record the results of surveys including the shape, contour, location, elevation, and dimensions of land or land features.
  • Coordinate findings with the work of engineering and architectural personnel, clients, and others concerned with projects.
  • Establish fixed points for use in making maps, using geodetic and engineering instruments.
  • Train assistants and helpers, and direct their work in such activities as performing surveys or drafting maps.
  • Adjust surveying instruments to maintain their accuracy.
  • Plan and conduct ground surveys designed to establish baselines, elevations, and other geodetic measurements.
  • Analyze survey objectives and specifications to prepare survey proposals or to direct others in survey proposal preparation.
  • Develop criteria for survey methods and procedures.
  • Survey bodies of water to determine navigable channels and to secure data for construction of breakwaters, piers, and other marine structures.
  • Conduct research in surveying and mapping methods using knowledge of techniques of photogrammetric map compilation and electronic data processing.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Surveyors.

  • Mathematics - Using mathematics to solve problems.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Coordination - Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
  • Time Management - Managing one's own time and the time of others.
  • Management of Personnel Resources - Motivating, developing, and directing people as they work, identifying the best people for the job.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Surveyors.

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