Survey Researchers

Plan, develop, or conduct surveys. May analyze and interpret the meaning of survey data, determine survey objectives, or suggest or test question wording. Includes social scientists who primarily design questionnaires or supervise survey teams.

Median Annual Wage: $49,760

Education: Master's degree (48%); Bachelor's degree (37%); Doctoral degree (11%)

Projected Growth: Faster than average (15% to 21%)

Related Job Titles: Research Associate; Research Assistant; Research Fellow; Study Director; Field Interviewer; Research Interviewer; Market Survey Representative; Telephone Interviewer; Survey Director; Research Methodologist

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Source: O*NET OnLine information for Survey Researchers.

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  • Collaborate with other researchers in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of surveys.
  • Consult with clients to identify survey needs and specific requirements, such as special samples.
  • Conduct surveys and collect data, using methods such as interviews, questionnaires, focus groups, market analysis surveys, public opinion polls, literature reviews, and file reviews.
  • Direct and review the work of staff members, including survey support staff and interviewers who gather survey data.
  • Determine and specify details of survey projects, including sources of information, procedures to be used, and the design of survey instruments and materials.
  • Prepare and present summaries and analyses of survey data, including tables, graphs, and fact sheets that describe survey techniques and results.
  • Monitor and evaluate survey progress and performance, using sample disposition reports and response rate calculations.
  • Produce documentation of the questionnaire development process, data collection methods, sampling designs, and decisions related to sample statistical weighting.
  • Analyze data from surveys, old records, or case studies, using statistical software.
  • Direct updates and changes in survey implementation and methods.
  • Hire and train recruiters and data collectors.
  • Conduct research to gather information about survey topics.
  • Review, classify, and record survey data in preparation for computer analysis.
  • Write training manuals to be used by survey interviewers.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Survey Researchers.

  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Time Management - Managing one's own time and the time of others.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Mathematics - Using mathematics to solve problems.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Survey Researchers.

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