School Psychologists

Investigate processes of learning and teaching and develop psychological principles and techniques applicable to educational problems.

Median Annual Wage: $68,900

Education: Master's degree (47%); Post-master's certificate (32%); Professional degree (19%)

Projected Growth: Average (8% to 14%)

Related Job Titles: Psychologist; Consulting Psychologist; School Psychologist; Child Study Team Director; School Psychometrist; Early Intervention School Psychologist; Bilingual School Psychologist

Browse Job Listings

Browse Schools

Source: O*NET OnLine information for School Psychologists.

More Life, Physical, and Social Science Careers

  • Select, administer, and score psychological tests.
  • Interpret test results and prepare psychological reports for teachers, administrators, and parents.
  • Counsel children and families to help solve conflicts and problems in learning and adjustment.
  • Provide consultation to parents, teachers, administrators, and others on topics such as learning styles and behavior modification techniques.
  • Report any pertinent information to the proper authorities in cases of child endangerment, neglect, or abuse.
  • Maintain student records, including special education reports, confidential records, records of services provided, and behavioral data.
  • Assess an individual child's needs, limitations, and potential, using observation, review of school records, and consultation with parents and school personnel.
  • Promote an understanding of child development and its relationship to learning and behavior.
  • Collect and analyze data to evaluate the effectiveness of academic programs and other services, such as behavioral management systems.
  • Develop individualized educational plans in collaboration with teachers and other staff members.
  • Attend workshops, seminars, or professional meetings to remain informed of new developments in school psychology.
  • Serve as a resource to help families and schools deal with crises, such as separation and loss.
  • Collaborate with other educational professionals to develop teaching strategies and school programs.
  • Initiate and direct efforts to foster tolerance, understanding, and appreciation of diversity in school communities.
  • Refer students and their families to appropriate community agencies for medical, vocational, or social services.
  • Design classes and programs to meet the needs of special students.
  • Provide educational programs on topics such as classroom management, teaching strategies, or parenting skills.
  • Conduct research to generate new knowledge that can be used to address learning and behavior issues.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for School Psychologists.

  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Social Perceptiveness - Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for School Psychologists.

Search Local Job Listings