Environmental Economists

Conduct economic analysis related to environmental protection and use of the natural environment, such as water, air, land, and renewable energy resources. Evaluate and quantify benefits, costs, incentives, and impacts of alternative options using economic principles and statistical techniques.

Median Annual Wage: $95,710

Education: Doctoral degree (57%); Master's degree (29%); Bachelor's degree (7%)

Projected Growth: Average (8% to 14%)

Related Job Titles: Economist; Environmental Economist; Natural Resource Economist; Principal Associate; Principal Research Economist; Resource Economist; Senior Economist

Browse Job Listings

Browse Schools

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Environmental Economists.

More Life, Physical, and Social Science Careers

  • Conduct research on economic and environmental topics, such as alternative fuel use, public and private land use, soil conservation, air and water pollution control, and endangered species protection.
  • Assess the costs and benefits of various activities, policies, or regulations that affect the environment or natural resource stocks.
  • Collect and analyze data to compare the environmental implications of economic policy or practice alternatives.
  • Prepare and deliver presentations to communicate economic and environmental study results, to present policy recommendations, or to raise awareness of environmental consequences.
  • Develop programs or policy recommendations to achieve environmental goals in cost-effective ways.
  • Perform complex, dynamic, and integrated mathematical modeling of ecological, environmental, or economic systems.
  • Conduct research to study the relationships among environmental problems and patterns of economic production and consumption.
  • Write research proposals and grant applications to obtain private or public funding for environmental and economic studies.
  • Write social, legal, or economic impact statements to inform decision-makers for natural resource policies, standards, or programs.
  • Develop environmental research project plans, including information on budgets, goals, deliverables, timelines, and resource requirements.
  • Develop economic models, forecasts, or scenarios to predict future economic and environmental outcomes.
  • Develop programs or policy recommendations to promote sustainability and sustainable development.
  • Demonstrate or promote the economic benefits of sound environmental regulations.
  • Develop systems for collecting, analyzing, and interpreting environmental and economic data.
  • Examine the exhaustibility of natural resources or the long-term costs of environmental rehabilitation.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Environmental Economists.

  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Mathematics - Using mathematics to solve problems.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Environmental Economists.

Search Local Job Listings