Veterinary Technologists and Technicians

Perform medical tests in a laboratory environment for use in the treatment and diagnosis of diseases in animals. Prepare vaccines and serums for prevention of diseases. Prepare tissue samples, take blood samples, and execute laboratory tests, such as urinalysis and blood counts. Clean and sterilize instruments and materials and maintain equipment and machines. May assist a veterinarian during surgery.

Median Annual Wage: $31,070

Education: Associate's degree (68%); High school diploma or equivalent (12%); Post-secondary certificate (11%)

Projected Growth: Much faster than average (22% or higher)

Related Job Titles: Veterinary Technician (Vet Tech); Registered Veterinary Technician (RVT); Licensed Veterinary Technician (LVT); Certified Veterinary Technician (CVT); Veterinary Assistant; Veterinary Nurse; Internal Medicine Veterinary Technician; Medical Technologist; Emergency Veterinary Technician; Veterinary Laboratory Technician (Veterinary Lab Tech)

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Source: O*NET OnLine information for Veterinary Technologists and Technicians.

More Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Careers

  • Maintain controlled drug inventory and related log books.
  • Administer anesthesia to animals, under the direction of a veterinarian, and monitor animals' responses to anesthetics so that dosages can be adjusted.
  • Restrain animals during exams or procedures.
  • Administer emergency first aid, such as performing emergency resuscitation or other life saving procedures.
  • Prepare and administer medications, vaccines, serums, or treatments, as prescribed by veterinarians.
  • Perform laboratory tests on blood, urine, or feces, such as urinalyses or blood counts, to assist in the diagnosis and treatment of animal health problems.
  • Observe the behavior and condition of animals and monitor their clinical symptoms.
  • Clean and sterilize instruments, equipment, or materials.
  • Collect, prepare, and label samples for laboratory testing, culture, or microscopic examination.
  • Prepare animals for surgery, performing such tasks as shaving surgical areas.
  • Discuss medical health of pets with clients, such as post-operative status.
  • Fill prescriptions, measuring medications and labeling containers.
  • Take animals into treatment areas and assist with physical examinations by performing such duties as obtaining temperature, pulse, and respiration data.
  • Take and develop diagnostic radiographs, using x-ray equipment.
  • Maintain laboratory, research, or treatment records, as well as inventories of pharmaceuticals, equipment, or supplies.
  • Prepare treatment rooms for surgery.
  • Provide veterinarians with the correct equipment or instruments, as needed.
  • Perform dental work, such as cleaning, polishing, or extracting teeth.
  • Clean kennels, animal holding areas, surgery suites, examination rooms, or animal loading or unloading facilities to control the spread of disease.
  • Schedule appointments and procedures for animals.
  • Provide information or counseling regarding issues such as animal health care, behavior problems, or nutrition.
  • Dress and suture wounds and apply splints or other protective devices.
  • Maintain instruments, equipment, or machinery to ensure proper working condition.
  • Give enemas and perform catheterizations, ear flushes, intravenous feedings, or gavages.
  • Provide assistance with animal euthanasia and the disposal of remains.
  • Supervise or train veterinary students or other staff members.
  • Monitor medical supplies and place orders when inventory is low.
  • Perform a variety of office, clerical, or accounting duties, such as reception, billing, bookkeeping, or selling products.
  • Bathe animals, clip nails or claws, and brush or cut animals' hair.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Veterinary Technologists and Technicians.

  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Service Orientation - Actively looking for ways to help people.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Veterinary Technologists and Technicians.

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