Instructional Designers and Technologists

Develop instructional materials and products and assist in the technology-based redesign of courses. Assist faculty in learning about, becoming proficient in, and applying instructional technology.

Median Annual Wage: $61,550

Education: Master's degree (65%); Bachelor's degree (26%); High school diploma or equivalent (4%)

Projected Growth: Average (8% to 14%)

Related Job Titles: Chief Technology Officer; Director, Educational Research and Product Strategy; Instructional Designer; Instructional Technologist; IT Senior Analyst (Instructional Technology Senior Analyst); Lead Performance Support Analyst; Learning Development Specialist; Senior Instructional Designer; Team Lead, Teacher Support and Student Intervention

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Source: O*NET OnLine information for Instructional Designers and Technologists.

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  • Define instructional, learning, or performance objectives.
  • Interview subject matter experts or conduct other research to develop instructional content.
  • Provide analytical support for the design and development of training curricula, learning strategies, educational policies, or courseware standards.
  • Design learning products, including web-based aids or electronic performance support systems.
  • Develop instructional materials and products for technology-based redesign of courses.
  • Design instructional aids for stand-alone or instructor-led classroom or online use.
  • Conduct needs assessments and strategic learning assessments to develop the basis for curriculum development or to update curricula.
  • Assess effectiveness and efficiency of instruction according to ease of instructional technology use and student learning, knowledge transfer, and satisfaction.
  • Develop instructional materials, such as lesson plans, handouts, or examinations.
  • Develop measurement tools to evaluate the effectiveness of instruction or training interventions.
  • Develop instruction or training roadmaps for online and blended learning programs.
  • Analyze performance data to determine effectiveness of instructional systems, courses, or instructional materials.
  • Adapt instructional content or delivery methods for different levels or types of learners.
  • Research and evaluate emerging instructional technologies or methods.
  • Recommend instructional methods, such as individual or group instruction, self-study, lectures, demonstrations, simulation exercises, and role-playing, appropriate for content and learner characteristics.
  • Edit instructional materials, such as books, simulation exercises, lesson plans, instructor guides, and tests.
  • Teach instructors to use instructional technology or to integrate technology with teaching.
  • Recommend changes to curricula or delivery methods, based on information such as instructional effectiveness data, current or future performance requirements, feasibility, and costs.
  • Provide technical advice on the use of current instructional technologies, including computer-based training, desktop videoconferencing, multimedia, and distance learning technologies.
  • Observe and provide feedback on instructional techniques, presentation methods, or instructional aids.
  • Develop master course documentation or manuals according to applicable accreditation, certification, or other requirements.
  • Provide technical support to clients in the implementation of designed instruction or in task analyses and instructional systems design.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Instructional Designers and Technologists.

  • Learning Strategies - Selecting and using training/instructional methods and procedures appropriate for the situation when learning or teaching new things.
  • Instructing - Teaching others how to do something.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Instructional Designers and Technologists.

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