Neurodiagnostic Technologists

Conduct electroneurodiagnostic (END) tests such as electroencephalograms, evoked potentials, polysomnograms, or electronystagmograms. May perform nerve conduction studies.

Median Annual Wage: $41,420

Education: Associate's degree (55%); Bachelor's degree (21%); Post-secondary certificate (12%)

Projected Growth: Much faster than average (22% or higher)

Related Job Titles: Electroneurodiagnostic Technologist; Neurodiagnostic Technologist; Certified Neurodiagnostic Technologist; Clinical Supervisor, Epilepsy Monitoring Unit; Electroneurodiagnostic Technologist Coordinator; Lead Neurodiagnostic Technologist; Manager, Neurodiagnostic Laboratory & Epilepsy Center (Manager, Neurodiagnostic Lab & Epilepsy Center); Registered Electroneurodiagnostic Technologist; Registered Polysomnographic Technologist; Senior Technologist

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Source: O*NET OnLine information for Neurodiagnostic Technologists.

More Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Careers

  • Indicate artifacts or interferences derived from sources outside of the brain, such as poor electrode contact or patient movement, on electroneurodiagnostic recordings.
  • Explain testing procedures to patients, answering questions or reassuring patients as needed.
  • Monitor patients during tests or surgeries, using electroencephalographs (EEG), evoked potential (EP) instruments, or video recording equipment.
  • Attach electrodes to patients using adhesives.
  • Conduct tests to determine cerebral death, the absence of brain activity, or the probability of recovery from a coma.
  • Measure patients' body parts and mark locations where electrodes are to be placed.
  • Measure visual, auditory, or somatosensory evoked potentials (EPs) to determine responses to stimuli.
  • Calibrate, troubleshoot, or repair equipment and correct malfunctions as needed.
  • Summarize technical data to assist physicians to diagnose brain, sleep, or nervous system disorders.
  • Set up, program, or record montages or electrical combinations when testing peripheral nerve, spinal cord, subcortical, or cortical responses.
  • Collect patients' medical information needed to customize tests.
  • Adjust equipment to optimize viewing of the nervous system.
  • Submit reports to physicians summarizing test results.
  • Assist in training technicians, medical students, residents or other staff members.
  • Participate in research projects, conferences, or technical meetings.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Neurodiagnostic Technologists.

  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Social Perceptiveness - Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
  • Service Orientation - Actively looking for ways to help people.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Neurodiagnostic Technologists.

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