Geospatial Information Scientists and Technologists

Research or develop geospatial technologies. May produce databases, perform applications programming, or coordinate projects. May specialize in areas such as agriculture, mining, health care, retail trade, urban planning, or military intelligence.

Median Annual Wage: $83,410

Education: Bachelor's degree (61%); Master's degree (21%); Associate's degree (14%)

Projected Growth: Slower than average (3% to 7%)

Related Job Titles: Geographic Information Systems Coordinator (GIS Coordinator); Geographic Information Systems Analyst (GIS Analyst); Geographic Information Systems Specialist (GIS Specialist); Geographic Information Systems Administrator (GIS Administrator); Geographic Information Systems Manager (GIS Manager); Geographical Information System Analyst (GIS Analyst); Geospatial Intelligence Subject Matter Expert; Geospatial Program Management Officer; Resource Analyst; Technical Leader

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Source: O*NET OnLine information for Geospatial Information Scientists and Technologists.

More Computer and Mathematical Careers

  • Coordinate the development or administration of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) projects, including the development of technical priorities, client reporting and interface, or coordination and review of schedules and budgets.
  • Provide technical expertise in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology to clients or users.
  • Create, analyze, report, convert, or transfer data, using specialized applications program software.
  • Design, program, or model Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications or procedures.
  • Provide technical support for computer-based Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping software.
  • Perform computer programming, data analysis, or software development for Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications, including the maintenance of existing systems or research and development for future enhancements.
  • Lead, train, or supervise technicians or related staff in the conduct of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analytical procedures.
  • Collect, compile, or integrate Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data, such as remote sensing or cartographic data for inclusion in map manuscripts.
  • Read current literature, talk with colleagues, continue education, or participate in professional organizations or conferences to keep abreast of developments in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology, equipment, or systems.
  • Meet with clients to discuss topics such as technical specifications, customized solutions, or operational problems.
  • Perform integrated or computerized Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analyses to address scientific problems.
  • Create visual representations of geospatial data using complex procedures, such as analytical modeling, three-dimensional renderings, or plot creation.
  • Document, design, code, or test Geographic Information Systems (GIS) models, internet mapping solutions, or other applications.
  • Prepare training materials for or make presentations to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) users.
  • Assist users in formulating Geographic Information Systems (GIS) requirements or understanding the implications of alternatives.
  • Make recommendations regarding upgrades considering implications of new or revised Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software, equipment, or applications.
  • Conduct or coordinate research, data analysis, systems design, or support for software such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS) or Global Positioning Systems (GPS) mapping software.
  • Conduct feasibility studies or identify system, time, equipment, or cost requirements for projects.
  • Create, edit, or analyze geospatial data, using Global Positioning Systems (GPS) or digitizing techniques.
  • Develop specialized computer software routines, internet-based Geographic Information Systems (GIS) databases, or business applications to customize geographic information.
  • Coordinate or direct research or publication activities of technicians or related staff.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Geospatial Information Scientists and Technologists.

  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Writing - Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Complex Problem Solving - Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Science - Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
  • Active Learning - Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
  • Systems Analysis - Determining how a system should work and how changes in conditions, operations, and the environment will affect outcomes.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Geospatial Information Scientists and Technologists.

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