Computer and Information Research Scientists

Conduct research into fundamental computer and information science as theorists, designers, or inventors. Develop solutions to problems in the field of computer hardware and software.

Median Annual Wage: $108,360

Education: Master's degree (59%)

Projected Growth: Faster than average (15% to 21%)

Related Job Titles: Computer Scientist; Control System Computer Scientist; Scientific Programmer Analyst

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Source: O*NET OnLine information for Computer and Information Research Scientists.

More Computer and Mathematical Careers

  • Assign or schedule tasks to meet work priorities and goals.
  • Evaluate project plans and proposals to assess feasibility issues.
  • Consult with users, management, vendors, and technicians to determine computing needs and system requirements.
  • Apply theoretical expertise and innovation to create or apply new technology, such as adapting principles for applying computers to new uses.
  • Meet with managers, vendors, and others to solicit cooperation and resolve problems.
  • Conduct logical analyses of business, scientific, engineering, and other technical problems, formulating mathematical models of problems for solution by computers.
  • Develop and interpret organizational goals, policies, and procedures.
  • Participate in staffing decisions and direct training of subordinates.
  • Develop performance standards, and evaluate work in light of established standards.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Computer and Information Research Scientists.

  • Critical Thinking - Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Systems Evaluation - Identifying measures or indicators of system performance and the actions needed to improve or correct performance, relative to the goals of the system.
  • Systems Analysis - Determining how a system should work and how changes in conditions, operations, and the environment will affect outcomes.
  • Judgment and Decision Making - Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
  • Reading Comprehension - Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Programming - Writing computer programs for various purposes.
  • Time Management - Managing one's own time and the time of others.
  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Computer and Information Research Scientists.

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