Ship Engineers

Supervise and coordinate activities of crew engaged in operating and maintaining engines, boilers, deck machinery, and electrical, sanitary, and refrigeration equipment aboard ship.

Median Annual Wage: $68,100

Education: Post-secondary certificate (68%); High school diploma or equivalent (12%); Some college, no degree (10%)

Projected Growth: Average (8% to 14%)

Related Job Titles: Engineer; Ferry Engineer; Port Engineer; Tug Boat Engineer; Barge Engineer; Harbor Engineer; Towboat Engineer; Harbor Tug Engineer; Inland Marine Towing Vessel Engineer

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Source: O*NET OnLine information for Ship Engineers.

More Transportation and Material Moving Careers

  • Monitor engine, machinery, or equipment indicators when vessels are underway and report abnormalities to appropriate shipboard staff.
  • Maintain electrical power, heating, ventilation, refrigeration, water, or sewerage systems.
  • Record orders for changes in ship speed or direction and note gauge readings or test data, such as revolutions per minute or voltage output, in engineering logs or bellbooks.
  • Monitor and test operations of engines or other equipment so that malfunctions and their causes can be identified.
  • Start engines to propel ships and regulate engines and power transmissions to control speeds of ships, according to directions from captains or bridge computers.
  • Maintain complete records of engineering department activities, including machine operations.
  • Perform or participate in emergency drills, as required.
  • Maintain or repair engines, electric motors, pumps, winches, or other mechanical or electrical equipment or assist other crew members with maintenance or repair duties.
  • Perform general marine vessel maintenance or repair work, such as repairing leaks, finishing interiors, refueling, or maintaining decks.
  • Operate or maintain off-loading liquid pumps or valves.
  • Clean engine parts and keep engine rooms clean.
  • Supervise the activities of marine engine technicians engaged in the maintenance or repair of mechanical or electrical marine vessels and inspect their work to ensure that it is performed properly.
  • Order and receive engine room stores, such as oil or spare parts, maintain inventories, and record usage of supplies.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Ship Engineers.

  • Active Listening - Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Equipment Maintenance - Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
  • Troubleshooting - Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
  • Operation Monitoring - Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
  • Monitoring - Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
  • Repairing - Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.
  • Operation and Control - Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
  • Quality Control Analysis - Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.
  • Speaking - Talking to others to convey information effectively.

Source: O*NET OnLine information for Ship Engineers.

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