7 Tips You Should Know Before Starting a Food Business

tips for starting a food business
tips for starting a food business

Starting a food business is challenging. This is because many would-be entrepreneurs who want to enter this field don’t know how to start, what the requirements are, the costs associated with setting up the business, and so forth. Studies indicate that many food businesses fail within the first year of being on the market. To prevent that from happening to you, it is better to know some tips before starting a food business.

Tips for Starting a Food Business

1. Define the concept

Worldwide, there are several food businesses focused on different sectors. For example, one of the most popular in recent years is fast food, thanks to the variety of dishes that it offers (chicken, burger, French fries etc.) Decide what type of food you want to offer.

how to start a food business

You do not have to limit yourself to a single dish. If you love Italian food, you can offer the main dish (pizza for example), but you can also make available to the customer other options such as spaghetti, macaroni, lasagna, fettuccini, etc.

2. Investigate the market

As in any business, you must investigate the market before opening a restaurant or anything related to food. This means trying to know what are the preferences and tastes of consumers, and making sure that there is enough demand for the product.

One way to do this is to survey people who frequent the area where you intend to open the food business. Determine their preferences, if they would go to a new food establishment or restaurant such as the one you are planning to put up, and how much they would be willing to spend on each visit.

3. Determine your target market

Another important point is to clearly define who your target market will be. This way, you can analyze and decide which strategies to use for this type of customers. For example, you must determine whether people are in a hurry to eat or if they enjoy taking their time, if they are willing to travel a certain distance to go to a good restaurant, if they are willing to pay a good price for a good dish, etc.

4. Consider starting small

You should opt to test your idea before you go all out with a pop-up location. It will provide you with an opportunity to run through your concept without all of the risks involved. Many people started their food business in the comfort of their own homes. They immersed themselves in something they enjoy and made a living or a career out of it. Once they outgrew the space, they moved on to a larger area.

Starting a business after meticulous planning is a big step, but remember starting small is always a good idea. You can try to have your own food cart or rent a food truck for a few months just to see how the business will go. If this becomes successful, then you can consider moving to a permanent location and scale up.

5. Find a good location

A determining factor in the success of your food business is its location, which is why you should take your time when choosing where to set up your food stall or restaurant. You can choose a central place where you will have the advantage of being seen by a greater number of customers. However, you may have to deal with higher rent costs and fierce competition.

restaurant

On the other hand, if you choose a less than ideal place, the rent will be lower and there will be less competition. The obvious disadvantage is that fewer people will be able to see you. One way to address this is by advertising or promoting your food business and making sure you have a great product. Also, when choosing a location for a restaurant or food establishment, make sure that it has enough parking for the number of customers you estimate will come in their own vehicles.

6. Set costs

One thing that you should know is how much does it cost to open a food business or a restaurant. In the case of restaurants, there are usually many hidden costs in setting up your business. It includes the cost of registration, licenses, permits, taxes, food handling certificates, food supplies, appliances, equipment, furniture, and workers compensation. When computing your investment budget, take your time and consider all costs (including rent), and if possible, try to reserve a small budget in case you end up lacking money.

7. Food safety and crew training

This is one important element of any food business. There are food safety guidelines that you must follow in order to protect your employees, your business and most especially your customers. If you follow food laws and regulations, this will help your business grow and earn a positive reputation. Training your employees is also essential so they can provide good quality products and services as well as observe total workplace hygiene in all areas of your business.

Conclusion

Starting a food business and managing it is not a simple task. It requires patience, dedication, perseverance to overcome difficulties that may arise, and discipline to cope with all the work involved in managing a food business. To become successful, you must be a good leader and work with your team closely. Hopefully, after you’ve read these tips, you can achieve success in this challenging (yet rewarding) field.

9 Signs Your Resume is Selling You Short

Don’t let your resume hold you back from all the opportunities out there!

Unlike a college test or job project, you’ll rarely receive feedback on your resume; potential employers just don’t have the time to send a personalized critique outlining your mistakes.

That’s understandable — but tough, especially when your inbox sits stagnant after a round of job applications. How are you supposed to know what you’re doing wrong? Before you totally lose your mind, take a few minutes to review these nine ways your resume could be selling you short.

1. Your resume bleeds onto two pages

If you’re a recent college graduate and have less than seven years of relevant experience in the workforce, stick to a one-page resume. Yes, even the most accomplished college graduates should only have a one-pager.

Why? Recruiters don’t want to shuffle through two pages of career details, especially when your career has barely started. That extra page will be seen as unnecessary fluff — and it likely is.

2. You went all out with your resume design

A resume should appeal to the eye, but there’s no need for colorful borders, intricate graphics, or a headshot (unless your career calls for one, like acting or modeling). This distracts the reader from what’s important: the text.

Also, many large companies use an applicant tracking system (ATS), which is software that analyzes resumes and weeds out the least-qualified candidates based on algorithms. So if this ATS software scans graphics that it can’t decipher, your resume might get an automatic “no.”

3. You start with all the wrong information

Way back when, job applicants physically mailed their cover letters and resumes to a company. But times have changed, and your resume needs to reflect that.

There’s no need to take up two lines in your header to list your street address. If anything, including it could hurt your chances of securing a job. For example, if you live across the country but another candidate lives down the block and is almost as qualified as you, then why not just hire that person instead?

Replace your street address with something more digitally friendly, like your LinkedIn profile URL or your online portfolio. Recruiters and hiring managers are going to scour the internet for you anyway, so you might as well make it easier on them.

Oh, and while you’re updating your online profiles, take a peek at your email address. If it’s not a variation of your name, then consider making a new one. You can easily snag a free email address through Gmail or Outlook to create a new, professional email address.

4. You open with an objective

Now that your header is polished, it’s time to launch into the meat of your resume. If your eye scans down to an objective statement, press pause.

Objective statements tend to be generic and don’t offer an employer any additional information to help them understand who you are or your career goals. Replace your objective statement with a professional summary, instead. This is your elevator pitch — it should explain in three to five sentences your qualifications and immediate career goals. Don’t solely focus on yourself; tailor this summary to each job and employer so it feels personalized.

5. You include high school activities

Once you graduate college, you should wipe all mentions of high school off your resume. Focus instead on your college activities and internships. Then, once you’re a few years into your career, you can start shedding those college accolades, too.

6. You lack consistency

Consistency is key, and there are a few areas you’ll want to check for consistency on your resume.

First, start with the formatting. If your first header is underlined, bolded, and centered, make sure your second header is formatted the same way.

Second, make sure your details are presented consistently. If your city and state details are presented as “Denver, CO,” for example, don’t list the next one as “Denver, Colorado.” Check your dates as well. If you list a position as “May 2016 to December 2016,” don’t list your next position as “January 2017–June 2017.” It’s little details like this that can turn an employer off.

Finally, check your verb tenses. All your past experience should be listed in the past tense, while your current position(s) should be written in the present tense; keep that consistent.

7. Your descriptions “tell” when they should “show”

Did you ever have an English teacher encourage you to “show, don’t tell!” Well, that rule of thumb applies to your resume, too.

Comb through your job and activity descriptions. How much are you showing, and how much are you telling? Your points will be stronger if you can show how you resolved a workflow issue rather than simply stating it.

Additionally, see if you can quantify your accomplishments. For example, if, as an intern, you wrote five blog posts a week on top of other responsibilities, that’s pretty impressive. You’re showing the potential employer you’re a hard worker by backing up your statement with cold, hard facts.

On a related note, take a look at your “skills” section. It’s fine to include this section, especially if you’re in a more technical field. Maybe you want potential employers to know you can handle the intricacies of Python and Java. Or maybe you’re bilingual, which will help you in a customer service position.

Don’t, however, use a skills section to list implied skills like “effective written and verbal communication skills,” “organization,” or “conflict resolution.” Your past experience listed on your resume should already show this, so there’s no need to waste space.

8. You list references

It’s great you’ve recruited some solid references to join you on your job search; however, their assistance won’t be needed until later on in the job search.

A recruiter or hiring manager will likely contact your references after a phone screening and interview with you, so there’s no need to include those upfront on your resume. For that reason, cut your list of references. There’s also no need to state that references are “available upon request” — that should go without saying.

9. You didn’t recruit a proofreader

No matter how many times you read your resume, you’ll likely miss something so obvious. That’s just how the brain works — it starts auto-filling words to meet expectations.

In order to break the sequence, get someone else to read over your resume. Send it to your parents, a close friend, or your significant other —  anyone who has an eye for grammar and typos. The more sets of eyes, the better.

There are also professional options where you can submit your resume for a review to check for all of the above mistakes that people make on their resume.

Now that you’ve fixed up your resume, go ahead and click “submit” with confidence because your resume is no longer selling you short!

Author: Carson Kohler is a contributor to TopResume, the largest resume-writing service in the world. Not sure if your resume is selling you short and stopping you from getting the interviews you deserve? You can check with a free resume review from TopResume today!

Deciding What Your Next Job Should Be

career path
career path

Recently, I was coaching a client that was really struggling with her next career move. She had decided that she didn’t want to continue in her current job and industry but couldn’t figure out how to take a next step.

She had talked to friends, scoured the internet but hadn’t come to any conclusions. You may find yourself in a similar situation.

I need a change but I don’t know what I want!

It’s important to know what you’re good at, so take the aptitude test. It will provide you interesting data but it’s not the WHOLE story. In order to find that next best thing, it’s critical to investigate what you like, love and want. This might sound mushy but it’s not.

Back to my client. Let’s call her Charlotte. As Charlotte spoke about trying to solve the mystery of what to do next, her face showed her concern. Brows furrowed. Eyes searching. She looked lost.

So, we refocused the conversation to what she knows, rather than what she doesn’t.

• What does she like about her current role?
• What are her favorite things to do in her current role?
• If she were designing a new role, what characteristics would be important to her?
• In general, what does she love to do; that time disappears when she does it?
• What does she value in life?

This conversation provided a wealth of information about what she needs to consider in her next role.

• She likes being in a position to help others achieve their goals.
• She likes to be challenged. She likes goals and drives to achieve them.
• She likes to be active and finds time disappears when she’s physically active.
• She values developing close relationships.
• She loves to be creative.
• She’s highly motivated by learning.
• She wants to maintain financial stability.

She can use this information to ask the right questions in job interviews to understand whether the role will be something she likes in addition to something she will be good at.

BUT we discovered more. Charlotte’s been tinkering around with candle-making and lotion recipes. You should have seen her face change as she talked about what’s she’s been up to. She was a different person. Her face exuded energy. She smiled. She talked more quickly.

This hobby also “ticked” a lot of the things we discovered she wanted in a future role: helping others, challenges, goals, learning, creativity, relationships. But, exploring it was scary because she couldn’t see how this would provide financial stability right now.

This is what we discovered:

• Charlotte’s job would feel more tolerable if she were pursuing candle-making on the side, so we wouldn’t feel so desperate about escaping it.
• She doesn’t have to have all the answers right now. She can “baby-step” her way to the future.
• She doesn’t have to risk stability to explore something new.

So, Charlotte left the session with a new checklist of things to look for in new roles and some assignments related to her future candle-making empire.

• Create a concrete goal related to candle-making
• Do one thing every day to future her candle-making empire
• Find an accountability partner that will help her stay accountable for her goals

If you would like to figure out your next step:

• Take the aptitude test
• Order and complete the Guide to Knowingness Workbook
• Schedule a coaching session